Serengeti National Park

Country: Tanzania
Serengeti National Park logo

Serengeti National Park is undoubtedly the best-known wildlife sanctuary in the world, unequalled for its natural beauty and scientific value, it has the greatest concentration of plains game in Africa

The Serengeti National Park in Tanzania was established in 1952. It is home to the greatest wildlife spectacle on earth – the great migration of wildebeest and zebra. The resident population of lion, cheetah, elephant, giraffe, and birds is also impressive. There’s a wide variety of accommodation available, from luxury lodges to mobile camps. The park covers 5,700 sq miles, (14,763 sq km), it’s larger than Connecticut, with at most a couple hundred vehicles driving around.

The Park can be divided into 3 sections. The popular southern/central part (Seronera Valley), is what the Maasai called the “serengit”, the land of endless plains. It’s classic savannah, dotted with acacias and filled with wildlife. The western corridor is marked by the Grumeti River, and has more forests and dense bush. The north, Lobo area, meets up with Kenya’s Masai Mara Reserve, is the least visited section.

Two World Heritage Sites and two Biosphere Reserves have been established within the 30,000 km² region. It’s unique ecosystem has inspired writers from Ernest Hemingway to Peter Mattheissen, filmakers like Hugo von Lawick and Alan Root as well as numerous photographers and scientists – many of which have put their works at our disposal to create this website.

The Serengeti ecosystem is one of the oldest on earth. The essential features of climate, vegetation and fauna have barely changed in the past million years. Early man himself made an appearance in Olduvai Gorge about two million years ago. Some patterns of life, death, adaptation and migration are as old as the hills themselves.

It is the migration for which Serengeti is perhaps most famous. Over a million wildebeest and about 200,000 zebras flow south from the northern hills to the southern plains for the short rains every October and November, and then swirl west and north after the long rains in April, May and June. So strong is the ancient instinct to move that no drought, gorge or crocodile infested river can hold them back.

The Wildebeest travel through a variety of parks, reserves and protected areas and through a variety of habitat. Join us to explore the different forms of vegetation and landscapes of the Serengeti ecosystem and meet some of their most fascinating inhabitants.

Serengeti National Park map

Serengeti National Park map

Vital Information

Serengeti National Park Vital Information

Activities

Etosha National Park Gates

Vital Information

The climate of the Serengeti National Park is subtropical, with a dry and relatively cool season from May to August, a warmer and still quite dry season in September and October, and a rainy and quite hot season from November to April.
The park is located at an altitude between 1,100 and 2,000 meters (3,600/6,600 feet); the altitude tempers the heat, so even though we are just south of the Equator, at night it can be cool, or even cold in the highest areas and in the cool season. However, the sun is very strong, and requires appropriate protection, especially when it passes through the zenith at mid-day (ie around mid-March and late September).
Here are the average temperatures of the Ikoma Safari Camp, located at 1,400 meters (4,600 feet) of altitude.

Serengeti – Average temperatures

Month

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Min (°C)

16

16

16

16

16

15

14

15

15

16

16

16

Max (°C)

29

29

29

28

27

27

26

27

28

29

28

28

Min (°F)

61

61

61

61

61

59

57

59

59

61

61

61

Max (°F)

84

84

84

82

81

81

79

81

82

84

82

82

Rainfall hovers around 900/1,000 millimeters (35/40 inches) per year in much of the park; in the north it reaches 1,400 mm (55 in), while in the southeast, the most arid area, it drops below 800 mm (31.5 in). The rainy season, which as mentioned goes from November to April, is actually divided into two, with an interim period, in January and February, which, however, is not very dry: from October to December it’s the “short rains season”, and from March to May (but in the southern part from February to April) it’s the “long rains season”. Consequently, in January and February the rains diminish, but not in a very pronounced way, in fact they are still between 80 and 100 mm (3.1 and 4 in) per month.
Here is the average precipitation.

Serengeti – Average precipitation

Month

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Year

Prec.(mm)

80

100

130

155

90

35

15

30

55

70

115

105

980

Prec.(in)

3.1

3.9

5.1

6.1

3.5

1.4

0.6

1.2

2.2

2.8

4.5

4.1

38.6

Days

14

14

18

22

18

8

6

7

7

10

17

16

157

The park is famous for the animals of the savannah, but especially for the so-called “Great Migration“, which involve about two million mammals, especially wildebeest and zebras: they move throughout the year between the Serengeti and the neighbouring Masai Mara, in Kenya, while their predators, such as hyenas and big cats, are more stationary. The animals perform a circular migration, staying in the Serengeti from November to June, while from July to October they move to the Mara, especially in August and September. The reason why in this period (which corresponds to the austral winter) the animals migrate to the north, is that the dry season in the Serengeti is more pronounced than in the Mara, which is located closer to the Equator and therefore remains wetter, and equipped with lusher pastures. The exact location where the herds are located at any given time depends on the rains, and therefore can not be predicted with certainty, however, we can give some general indications.
In January and February, the animals are scattered south of the Serengeti, in the area of the Olduvai Gorge, north of the crater of Ngorongoro, in a semi-arid zone where the grass is low, and it’s easy to spot any predators such as hyenas and lions, of which there is no shortage.
Between February and March, the animals give birth to puppies, who become immediately able to move independently, and head west, in the area of Lake Ndutu.
In March, the season of the long rains begins, and the animals follow the lightnings, which indicate thunderstorms, and move to the north, in search of green pastures, entering the Serengeti and heading towards the swamps west of Seronera, in the direction of Lake Victoria.
Between May and June they go into heat and mate, and then continue to the north, heading towards the Grumeti River, which they will have to cross, each time choosing a different point. In June and July, they are moving towards the Masai Mara, in the northeast. From July to October they remain in the Masai Mara, where they move around in search of available pastures. From late October to December, in the short rains season, they return in the Serengeti, moving southward.

The Serengeti National Park borders other parks, like the aforementioned Mara in Kenya and the Ngorongoro to the southeast, the Maswa Game Reserve to the southwest, and the Grumeti and Ikorongo Game Reserves to the north-west.

The amount of sunshine in the Serengeti is good most of the year, since the rains come in the form of downpours or thunderstorms in the afternoon. However, in the period of the long rains, rainfall and cloud cover can last longer, even though the sun shines for a few hours a day.

Serengeti – Sunshine

Month

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Hours

8

8

8

7

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

Best Time

As regards to the climate, the best time in the Serengeti is the dry season, from June to September; it’s better to be equipped for cool or cold temperatures at night, especially at higher altitudes. In September, the temperatures begin to increase, and it can get a bit hot at lower elevations. During the month of October, the short rains season begins.
In June, the herds of wildebeest are located in the northwestern part of the park, in the area of the rivers Grumeti and Mara (Mara Region), where you can watch them when crossing rivers, while in July they move to the Masai Mara.
At the end of October or in November, the wildebeest return to the Serengeti, when, however, the short rains season has begun. For watching them in the other seasons, you can therefore choose January and February, in the “short dry season”, when they are in the southern part of the park or in nearby Ngorongoro, and are in breeding season.

Serengeti Park – Rules and Regulations

Serengeti Park is a natural habitat that is protected by the Tanzania Parks Act. Please take careful note of the rules and regulations below to ensure that you are not fined and/or prosecuted.

  • The Serengeti Park allows guests to drive their vehicles inside the park between the hours of 6 AM and 6 PM. Guests found driving inside the park outside of these hours may be removed from the park and/or prosecuted.
  • Adhere to the 50km/h speed limit. Failure to do so may result in a fine.
  • Unauthorized firearms are strictly prohibited.
  • Give way to the Animals. The park is their home and they have right of way.
  • Never feed the animals. Feeding animals may cause serious disruptions to their natural ability to find food. They may also become dangerous to humans as they lose their fear of humans. This always results in the animal being put down. Feeding animals may result in a fine and/or prosecution.
  • Only move along the authorized tracks. People who move along roads and areas which are not designated to guests may be liable to a fine and/or prosecution.
  • Leave everything as is. Do not pick any plants, remove any bones or pick up any firewood. Removal of natural items from the park is strictly forbidden and may results in a fine and/or prosecution.
  • Camping is only allowed in the designated camping areas.
  • Picnicking is only allowed in the designated picnic areas.
  • Do not disturb the natural wildlife in any way. Loud noises, throwing objects, loud music and imitating animal sounds are strictly forbidden.
  • These include hooting and also throwing items at an animal.
  • Littering is strictly prohibited as it can cause various sicknesses, poison or choke the animals. It also adversely affects natural plant growth.
  • While on game drive, smoking is prohibited. Please ensure that you dispose of your cigarettes responsibly at your lodge or camp.
  • Irresponsible disposal of cigarette buds can cause wild fires.
  • Do not light a fire or cause a fire to be lit. If you are camping, ensure that your fire is monitored at all times and extinguish it carefully.
  • Only leave your vehicle in designated areas. Do not leave your vehicle when close to any game animal, at least 200 meters for small game and much further for larger game.
  • Discourage your game ranger/driver/guide from approaching animals too closely. A good rule of thumb is at least 25 meters away. Some animals such as leopards, cheetahs and lions can be very skittish and approaching too close may result in their abandoning a kill, stop hunting or alter their natural behavior. If you see a guide/driver/game ranger not adhere to this rule, please report them to the first park official that you come across.
  • The Serengeti Park is not pet friendly. Any and all pets are forbidden in the park.
  • Drones are strictly forbidden. Use of a drone may result in a fine and/or prosecution.

Most safaris to the Serengeti start from the town of Arusha. The best option to get there is to fly into Kilimanjaro International Airport (JRO) which is situated about 46km/29mi from Arusha. It is also possible to fly into Julius Nyerere International Airport (DAR), just outside of Dar es Salaam, and use a domestic flight to get to Arusha Airport (ARK) or Kilimanjaro International Airport (JRO).

The most convenient way to get from Arusha to the Serengeti is by taking a small plane to one of the various airstrips in the park. The drive from Arusha to the Serengeti is about 325km/202mi and will take about eight hours. It is a bumpy ride and, for a large part, over dirt roads – but the trip offers beautiful scenery. You’ll surely see some wildlife on the way or may even do a game drive en route.

As the trip takes you through the Ngorongoro Conservation area, a popular option is to fly one way, and drive the other way taking in an overnight stop to visit the Ngorongoro Crater. Coming from the crater, the distance to the Seronera area in the Serengeti is about 140km/90mi, and the driving time is about three hours.

Before heading out to Serengeti National Park, make sure you have enough money set aside for your park admission! Park admission fees are set per person, per day, though occasionally tour groups can set less-expensive rates for their travellers.

Fees for Serengeti National Park

Park fees to Serengeti National Park for non-citizens is charged per person, per day. Adults over the age of 16 pay $60 USD; children aged 5-16 pay $20 USD; and children under the age of 5 are free. Weekly tickets are not available, and while this can certainly add up if travellers plan to stay for a week or longer, tour groups can often offer their travellers slightly discounted rates. 

 

Prices (per person, per day)

Adults (16+ years)$60 USD
Children (5-16 years)$20 USD
Children (0-5 years)free
 

How much does it cost to go to Serengeti?

On average, a one-week safari in Serengeti National Park can cost between $2,500 USD (budget) and $7,500 USD (luxury). Booking a safari with TourRadar provides the advantage of eliminating expenses as most amenities and permits are included in the price of the tour.

Tipping is customary while on a safari, and the typical expected amount is set at approximately $10 USD per person, per day for guides, and $5 USD per person, per day for trackers. Depending on the tour you join, some food and accommodation may be included, but it’s always a good idea to bring a little extra cash just in case.

Water. It is not safe to drink tap water in Tanzania. … To avoid health problems, use only bottled or filtered water for drinking and brushing your teeth. Bottled water is cheap and readily available in Tanzania, and all lodges and restaurants will have it available.

The Dry season (from late June to October) offers the best wildlife viewing in general – with the wildebeest migration as its absolute highlight. The timing of the migration varies every year (the best chance of seeing it is during June and July) while the wildebeest calving is from late January to February.

Best Time to Visit

Wildlife viewing in Serengeti National Park is good throughout the year, but certain areas are better at specific times. The Dry season (from late June to October) offers the best wildlife viewing in general – with the wildebeest migration as its absolute highlight. The timing of the migration varies every year (the best chance of seeing it is during June and July) while the wildebeest calving is from late January to February.

  • Best TimeJanuary-February for the wildebeest calving; June-September for general wildlife viewing with a chance of seeing the wildebeest crossing of the Grumeti River (June-July) or the Mara River (September)
  • High SeasonMost of the year – July to March (The Serengeti will be crowded around the Seronera area)
  • Low SeasonApril and May (Lower rated may apply)
  • Best WeatherJune to October (Little to no rainfall)
  • Worst WeatherMarch and April (Peak of Wet season)
 

June to October Dry Season

  • June and July are the best months to see the wildebeest migration in the western corridor and August to September in the north of the park
  • Animals are easier to spot since they concentrate around waterholes and rivers and the vegetation is less thick
  • It is mostly sunny and there is very little rain
  • There are very few mosquitoes and the chance of contracting malaria is minimal
  • The park gets quite crowded around the Seronera area
  • Mornings and nights get cold – warm clothing is recommended for early morning game drives from June to August

November to May Wet Season

  • Late January to February is the time to see the calving in the southern Serengeti – this is an excellent time to see predator action
  • The scenery is lush
  • April and May are low season, so it’s usually less crowded and rates might be lower
  • Although wildlife is easier to spot in the Dry season, the Serengeti offers good wildlife viewing throughout the year
  • Migratory birds are present and bird-watching is at its best
  • Except for March, April and May, rains are mostly short afternoon storms and seldom interfere with your trip
  • March to May is the peak of the Wet season
TZSTanzanian Shilling. The Tanzanian Shilling is the currency of Tanzania. Our currency rankings show that the most popular Tanzania Shilling exchange rate is the USD to TZS rate. The currency code for Shillings is TZS.

US Dollars are accepted almost everywhere in Tanzania. There is no need to exchange your US Dollars into Tanzanian Shillings while in Tanzania.

Most merchants will round up to the nearest dollar when doing a currency conversion so you may experience less buying power using US cash. For example, if a bottle of water is 1700 shillings and the current conversion is 1900 shillings to one US dollar. They will charge you one full dollar for the bottle of water.

Please note that your US dollars must be dated at least 2006 or newer. Many merchants will not accept US cash that is older than 2006. You can find out the date of your dollars by looking for the Series date on each bill.

Money

The easiest way to access money while travelling in Tanzania is at ATMs using a Visa card.

More Information

  • Tanzania’s currency is the Tanzanian shilling (Tsh). There are bills of Tsh500, Tsh1000, Tsh5000 and Tsh10,000, and coins of Tsh1, Tsh5, Tsh10 (although these three are rarely encountered), Tsh20, Tsh50, Tsh100 and Tsh200.
  • In 2011, bill design was changed for all amounts. Both the old and new styles are still accepted, and in circulation.
  • A Visa or MasterCard is essential for accessing money from ATMs and for paying entry fees at most national parks.
  • Credit cards are not widely accepted for hotel payment, except at top-end establishments. Where they are accepted, it’s often only with commissions. As a result, you will need to rely heavily on cash and ATMs.
  • US dollar bills dated prior to 2006 are not accepted anywhere. Post-2006 US dollars are generally accepted by larger establishments. For smaller, local places, you’ll need to exchange them for Tanzania shillings.

ATMs

ATMs are widespread in major towns, and all are open 24 hours. But they are occasionally out of service or out of cash, so you should have back-up funds. All internationally linked machines allow you to withdraw shillings with a Visa or MasterCard. Withdrawals are usually to a maximum of Tsh300,000 or Tsh400,000 per transaction (ATMs in small towns often have a limit of Tsh200,000 per transaction) and with a daily limit of Tsh1.2 million (less in small towns). Some machines also accept other cards linked to the Cirrus/Maestro/Plus networks.

The main operators:

Barclays Dar es Salaam, Arusha, Moshi, Zanzibar Island, Tanga

CRDB Major towns

Exim Dar es Salaam, Arusha, Moshi, Mwanza, Tanga, Morogoro

National Bank of Commerce Major towns

Stanbic Dar es Salaam, Arusha, Moshi, Mbeya

Standard Chartered Dar es Salaam, Arusha, Moshi, Mwanza

In large cities, queues at ATM machines on Friday afternoons are notoriously long; take care of your banking before then.

If your ATM withdrawal request is rejected (no matter what reason the machine gives), it could be for something as simple as requesting above the allowed transaction amount for that particular machine; it’s always worth trying again. Entering your PIN number erroneously three times results in a captured card.

Black Market

There’s essentially no black market for foreign currency. You can assume that the frequent offers you’ll receive on the street to change at high rates are a set-up.

Cash

US dollars, followed by euros, are the most convenient foreign currencies and get the best rates, although other major currencies are readily accepted in major centres. Bring a mix of large and small denominations, but note that US$50 and US$100 bills get better rates of exchange than smaller denominations. Old-style (small head) US bills and US bills dated prior to 2006 are not accepted anywhere.

Credit Cards

Bring a Visa card or MasterCard. These are essential for withdrawing money at ATMs; Visa is the most widely accepted. A Visa or MasterCard is also required for paying park fees at most national parks. Some upmarket hotels and tour operators accept credit cards for payment, often with a commission averaging from 5% to 10%. However, many don’t; always confirm in advance.

Exchanging Money

  • Change cash at banks or foreign exchange (forex) bureaus in major towns and cities; rates and commissions vary, so shop around.
  • Forex bureaus are usually quicker, less bureaucratic and open longer hours than banks, although most smaller towns don’t have them. They also tend to accept a wider range of currencies than banks.
  • The most useful bank for foreign exchange is NBC, with branches throughout the country. Countrywide, banks and forex bureaus are closed from noon on Saturday until Monday morning.
  • To reconvert Tanzanian shillings to hard currency, save at least some of your exchange receipts, although they are seldom checked. The easiest places to reconvert currency are at the airports in Dar es Salaam and Kilimanjaro, or try at forex shops or banks in major towns.
  • For after-hours exchange and exchanging in small towns, as well as for reconverting back to dollars or euros, many Indian-owned businesses will change money, although often at unfavourable rates.
  • In theory, it’s required that foreigners pay for accommodation, park fees, organised tours, upmarket hotels and the Zanzibar ferries in US dollars, although shillings are accepted almost everywhere at the going rate.

Tipping

  • Restaurants Tipping is generally not practised in small local establishments, especially in rural areas. In major towns and in places frequented by tourists, tips are expected. Some top-end places include a service charge in the bill. Usually, however, either rounding up the bill or adding about 10% to 15% is standard practice.
  • Safaris and Treks On treks and safaris, it’s common practice to tip drivers, guides, porters and other staff.
  • Taxis Tipping is not common practice, except for longer (full-day or multiday) rentals.

Travellers Cheques

Travellers cheques can no longer be changed anywhere in Tanzania.

Exchange Rates

AustraliaA$1Tsh1797
CanadaC$1Tsh1842
Europe€1Tsh2674
Japan¥100Tsh2014
KenyaKSh100Tsh2175
New ZealandNZ$1Tsh1638
South AfricaR10Tsh1698
UKUK£1Tsh3044
USUS$1Tsh2242

Activities

Game drives safari in Serengeti National Park

Morning Game drivesSerengeti National Park Game drives

If you start the game drives safari in Serengeti National Park the first thing in the morning, you will find the Serengeti at its most active. This is when Africa can reveal its cool side, so you should wrap up warm (we aim to be on the road before the sun rises at around 6.00 am).

Our guides will bring you as close as possible to the wildlife, just when the action is likely to be most exciting. Few predators hunt during the heat of the day, so the early morning is the best time to observe the thrill of the chase. It is also a magical time, with the subtle light dappling the landscape, the birds awakening and the sense of a great adventure beginning to unfurl. And just when your stomach starts to complain, we’ll give you a late breakfast in the bush, before further viewing leads you back at about 11.00 am, in good time for lunch and leisure at the camp.

Evening Game Drives

Heading into the bush for an evening game drive has a level of excitement and character all its own, as predators begin their nightly search for prey. As the day cools and the sky is streaked by red, gold and orange hues, you may be surprised by the roar of a lion, a galloping giraffe, or the high-pitched giggling of hyenas fighting over a kill. At a suitable vantage point, your guide will pause, allowing you to enjoy a sundowner in blissful comfort.

Full Day Game drives

These full day safaris are the best way to see the full range of what this magnificent park has to offer. Each excursion departs at around 6.30 am and returns back to camp by evening 5.30pm, with your private 4×4 fully equipped to cross the Serengeti in search of game.

The early mornings are relatively cool, but by midday it can become very hot indeed and sun-block lotion and hats are advised. Lunch is served between the game drives at the heart of Serengeti overlooking the plains and big game.

Last but not least it’s rewarding to watch the wildlife grazing around the plains of the camp, drinking water, or taking bath along the main swap which is in front of our lounge

balloon ride africa

One of the best ways for an aerial view of Serengeti National Park is to take a hot air balloon to the skies. The entire, magnificent park expanse is in sight, albeit, for a hefty price with the added “bonus” of a glass of champagne and a full breakfast. Hot air balloons take off at dawn–a great time to see lots of movement on the ground. The rides aren’t too long but entirely worth it if you’ve got the means. Leaving at dawn, riders are afforded a phenomenal view as the sun rises over the plains and comes to an end when the sun starts really heating up. As it peaks out over the landscape, the balloon will come down and level but with the treetops for n excellent view of the animals before they seek shelter from the heat of the sun.

Visitors’ centers can be a treasure trove of information but sometimes get left out of the picture because so many are very underwhelming. TheExplore the Serengeti Visitor Center Serengeti Visitor Center features a walking path for self-guided walks where exhibits and detailed signs educate on Serengeti history, its wildlife, and the ecosystem. There’s also a very good chance of spotting wildlife on route and a wealth of smaller critters like vibrant agama lizards and birds. The center also offers a really nice picnic area with tables with thatch umbrellas for shade, washrooms, and a gift and coffee shop at the Seronera Park headquarters. The center is a great place to stretch your legs, burn off some energy, and enjoy some insight into the history of the plains.

The semi-nomadic Maasai people, who live in the Great Rift Valley along northern Tanzania and southern Kenya, have a long history with the Serengeti plains and ecosystem. They are East AfriMaasai Villageca’s most renowned tribe because of their villages’ close proximity to many favored game reserves, they’re dedication to traditional practices, and their vibrant and unmistakable attire.

The villages, called bomas, are open to visitors–the Maasai are friendly people–who are engaged by learning about the Maasai way of life: traditions, customs, and lifestyle. A typical village visit generally includes a look at a local school, a short dance ceremony, and the chance to peruse and buy some locally made traditional handicrafts (an important source of income for the Maasai). While some visits might be fairly authentic, some can feel choreographed and commercial. This is one activity that requires some thought before committing.

The Serengeti is filled with nocturnal animals that cannot be seen during daytime game drives. Booking a night drive is the only wlions at nightay to see the extensive number of nocturnal animals living throughout the area include aardvarks, civets, bush babies, nightjars (birds), and maybe even some hunting predators (now that’s an incredible sight!).

There are also hyena, jackals, impala, giraffes, foxes, and zebra–there’s quite a list of night-loving animals. Night drives aren’t permitted directly in the park yet some outfitters have permission to operate them on the very outskirts of the park, offering a much different perspective. Without any park fencing, the outskirts still afford great opportunity to see the likes of almost any animal found within park boundaries. The thrill of glowing eyes and the sound of wildlife at night is pretty spectacular and also a terrific way to beat the heat.

Zoo Miami -Miami, FLJaguar Zoo Miami

Zoo Miami, formerly known as Miami MetroZoo has a tragic past. In 1965 Hurricane Betsy dumped over three feet of water onto the zoo and killed 25 animals. Then in 1992 Hurricane Andrew came in and destroyed 5,000 trees, the 1.5 acre aviary and all of its inhabitants. The zoo has worked hard over the past decade to restore it and one of the ways they have made themselves unforgettable is their sleepovers they offer. The best they offer is perhaps their Annual Big Cat-Nap Campout. This special once a year sleepover invites families to pitch their own tents in the grasslands for a real camping experience, complete with sounds effects provided by the very real zoo animals nearby. A favorite for kids and adults, make sure your kids are at least 6 years old and pre-register as this event is known to sell out fast!

Serengeti National Park Gates

National park gates in Serengeti national park, Tanzania

Naabi Hill gate
Altitude: 1600 m.a.m.s.l.
An administrative checkpoint and the location of both TANAPA and NCAA offices that is located in the eastern part of the Serengeti national park.

What to do there?
Pay for and get new permits, for either Serengeti national park or Ngorongoro conservation area.It is also an exit point for either park, where you could get your permit scanned for checkout.
There also is a viewpoint in the area that gives an amazing 360 degree view of the surrounding ‘endless plains’ or Serengeti, as well as a coffee shop and normal shop where you could buy snacks, souvenirs, maps etc.

Fort Ikoma gate
One of the official exit or entrance points into the Serengeti national park of northern Tanzania. It has a security gate, shops, toilets, and TANAPA administration offices where one can get a park permit or sign out one.
Most of the payments here are done electronically, using either an internationally recognised debit or credit card, or TANAPA pay cards.

What to do there?
complete the required documentation for entrance into or exit from the national park. The place is a bit far from the nearest civilization, but there are a few shops, and a campsite that is rarely used nearby.
For a list of other attractions in the vicinity, please see section below after map or the attractions page.

Ndabaka gate
The westernmost gate into the Serengeti national park, located along the Musoma – Mwanza highway. It is mostly used by tourists from Mwanza as it is a lot closer than the fort Ikoma gate.
Despite its location, the gate is surrounded by endless plains, on all but one side where lake Victoria is. Common animals that may be seen in the area include buffalo, hippo, zebra and Thompson’s gazelle.

What to do there?
Check out of the park or get permits for entry, or get information about it such as maps, or directions and even a ranger if needed. Most payments being done using electronic methods, either internationally recognized credit or debit cards, or TANAPA pay cards.
For a list of other attractions in the vicinity, please see section below after map or the attractions page

Handajega gate
A seldom used entrance point into Serengeti national park, that sits on its south western end, with nothing but rural Mwanza villages and farms nearby.

What to do there?
Get your permits checked before entry or exit from the park, or even acquire permits and information. Also game drives of it and nearby areas. For a list of other attraction in the nearby areas, please see our attractions page.

Bologonja gate
Altitude: 1720 m.a.m.s.l.
A security check point near the northern border of Serengeti national park – where the Maasai Mara game reserve begins. It is seldom used when compared to others due to it being remote.

What to do there?
Get your permits checked before entry or exit from the park, or even acquire permits and information. Also game drives of it and nearby areas. For a list of other attraction in the nearby areas, please see our attractions page.

Klein’s gate
An exit or entrance point near the north eastern border of Serengeti national park. Completely remote, it is used by those going to or coming from the Loliondo game controlled area, a rural Maasai teritory — with lake Natron on the eastern end.
The gate and the route is seldom used due to it being remote and the Loliondo route being uncharted territory, when compared to the TANAPA controlled parks. Still, part of the area is a wildebeest migration route, with some tented camps being situated there.

What to do there?
Get your permits checked, or pay for them before entering or exiting the park. For a list of other attractions that you could see in the area, please see the map below.

Serengeti National Park Tented Camp Accommodation

Kananga Special Tented Camp

Kananga Special Tented Camp is a very comfortable and reasonably priced tented camp at Seronera, in the heart of the Serengeti National Park. Hidden in an enclave, surrounded by spectacular views and abundant wildlife, our special tented camp sits at the foot of the Banagi hills, overlooking a beautiful savannah resplendent with the emblematic East African Thorn trees.

Camp Zebra

Camp Zebra’ is named after the Zebra which follow the Wildebeest during their world famous annual migration. Like the animal it is named after, ‘Camp Zebra’ follows the Wildebeest to the Northern part of the Serengeti National Park in June, July, August, September, October and November; and to the Southern part from December till March. Camp Zebra is closed from the middle of April till the end of May each year.

Mapito Tented Camp

Experience a true Africa at this authentic tented camp, that together with a beautiful setting and the sights and sounds of nature, offers you a list of modern luxuries and world-class service. This traditional tented camp is by far one of your best choices to explore Africa’s wildlife while on safari. Sitting snugly in a clearing that’s warmly embraced by protective Acacia trees, accommodation is offered in 13 spacious walk-in tents that create an intimate atmosphere.